Thursday, April 22, 2010

Annie is First Handicapped Goat to use Walkin Wheels

Annie is only four months old, but it has been a difficult start to life for the little goat that was abandoned after it was discovered that she suffered from CAE - Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis - a virus that causes both neurological and joint problems.

Julie Sale first met Annie when the goat was only a few days old and struggling to survive the disease that had already claimed her mother and sibling. Some insisted that euthanasia was the only option for the paralyzed goat. Julie, however, saw only potential when she looked at Annie and just could not resist offering the handicapped goat a second chance. So, Annie went home with Julie to be nursed back to health and to begin a long journey toward rehabilitation.

In less than four months, Annie has made terrific progress and deomonstrated that she is stubborn about one thing - learning how to walk! Although primarily used by dogs, the Walkin' Wheels for Handicapped Pets has proven to be the ideal solution for a growing goat like Annie. Walkin' Wheels is the pet industry's only fully adjustable dog wheelchair that can be easily resized without tools to accommodate changes in an animal's length, width and height.

Annie continues to improve and really feels at home with Julie and her other pets. Annie interacts well with the 6 dogs, 6 cats, 40 chickens, 2 ducks and 1 goose that also lovingly call Julie's house their home.

HandicappedPets.com is sharing frequent updates and photos and soon will be posting video of Annie on their Facebook page. Come and join us! Photos of Annie the goat with her canine and feline siblings are unbelievably heartwarming!

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Are you SURE its CAI??? if so its not a good prognoses no matter what you do... supportive threapy is all thats available and the end is always the same... Please dont let this sweet baby be in pain...now or in the future...


Findings: Merrick Vet Manual....

Caprine arthritis and encephalitis


The clinical course is always progressive. Encephalomyelitis is generally seen in kids 2-4 mo old but has been described in older kids and adult goats. Affected kids initially exhibit lameness, ataxia, and hindlimb placing deficits. Hypertonia and hyperreflexia are also common. Over time, signs progress to paraparesis or tetraparesis and paralysis. Depression, head tilt, circling, opisthotonos, torticollis, and paddling have also been described.

HandicappedPets.com said...

Yes, it is CAE. However, Annie has been treated by a veterinarian, and it appears that she is making remarkable progress and is not suffering. She is being well taken care of and has even taken a few steps on her own. Thank you for your concern and for following her progress.

spudog 8 said...

Has the possibility of acopper deficiency, a spinal cord abcess or chronic organophosphate poisoning bee ruled out.

Christine Maentz aka Crazy Goat Lady said...

I'm amazed to read posts from people trying to find a different diagnosis... just be happy this little creature found someone that cared enough to give her a chance at life! God Bless you Annie!

Christine Maentz aka Crazy Goat Lady said...

On previous post I meant, "God Bless Julie Sale"! and Annie too!

Claire the Shepherdess said...

This is great! I have a little angora goat who may not make it (we suspect a bout with deer meningeal worm) and he's been down for a week. But, if he does rally, this is something maybe he could use if he can get his front legs working. Lots of goats live long lives with CAE so I hope Annie does too. xox

HandicappedPets.com said...

Last we heard, Annie was doing fine and still walking without the use of the Walkin' Wheels dog wheelchair. We are so honored to have played a part in her recovery.